Photo: From the Eyes of a Walton Student

From the Eyes of a Walton Student

First-Year Reflections

    

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

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My name is Viridiana Jasso Hernandez, and I am a normal Mexican girl. I lived in a small town named Cuauhtemoc in the North of Mexico. I had lived at home with my parents and sisters my whole life. I went to high school near my house, and in general, I had a quiet life. Around four months ago I got a scholarship in the Walton International Scholarship Program (WISP) and that was the moment when I realized that I had to get out of my quiet life to come to JBU, which does not sound like a big deal but actually, to me it was a huge deal.

The idea of studying abroad is more than studying and getting good grades, you must be able to be part of the context where you are living, and it implies learning a new language, experimenting the culture, the traditions, and the religion and the different ways of life.

I arrived at JBU on August 15, I only have been here at JBU five weeks and I have had all possible emotions. My first week was the most relaxed.  The international students had this week for orientation, and that was amazing because I could meet other foreign students from Central America. In the orientation, we had some conferences about the best way to control stress, anxiety, and homesickness.  I did not understand why this week was focused on these aspects. Then, classes started and everything made sense.

The morning of my first day of classes I was so excited. I wanted to meet my classmates, my professors, I wanted to use all my books. I wanted to do everything. At the end of that day, my head felt like it was going to explode. Taking classes in English was harder than I thought and understanding the jokes of my classmates was impossible.  They laughed and I did not know what was happening. In these moments I realized how difficult it was going to be. Something funny is that even talking with Latinos in Spanish is difficult, they use some accents and a lot of expressions that I don’t understand. 

During these five weeks, I have had great experiences regarding culture. I am delighted to be learning and experiencing the differences in traditions and habits. Some of the greatest things are that people here really value time and honesty and everyone always is available to help you. People are really interested in your success as a student of JBU. They always try to make your life on campus a little easier, with the simplest things as greeting you with a smile or listening to you when you have had a bad day.

I feel that most of the community essence of JBU is because of its activities to reinforce us as Christians. One of my favorites activities is Chapel, which is the moment in my week when I remind myself that all the difficulties and sacrifices I am facing has a purpose, and this gives me the energy and force necessary to continue working in my school tasks.

I must admit that these five weeks at JBU have not been easy.  However, I have learned a lot of things and I have done things that I thought I could not, and this is in large part thanks to the amazing community at JBU.

Definitely, JBU has been much more than I expected so far. I cannot imagine how many more things to learn I have here. I am so willing to take advantage of each thing, resource, and activity that JBU has to offer me.  I am delighted with the idea of growth as a professional and as a Christian. I am sure this is going to provide me the maturity and the worldview to find the adequate way to use my knowledge and skills to confront the problems that the world is facing doing what I enjoy.

Blog HomePosted By: Viridiana Jasso Hernandez - 1/24/18 2:00 PM

 

 

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