Cool Facts

 Feel free to check out our JBU Engineering Facebook page for even more cool facts.

Scholarships

(Above: Larry Bland, Division Chair, presenting Zach Lee with his Scholarship)

John Brown University sophomore Zach Lee has been recognized by IEEE Power and Energy Society Scholarship Plus Initiative. The Initiative nationally recognizes undergraduate students who have declared a major in engineering, are high achievers with strong GPAs with distinctive extracurricular commitments and are committed to exploring the power and energy field. Zach will receive scholarship funds for up to 3 years as well as opportunities for internships and co-ops within the power and energy industry. IEEE (www.ieee.org) is the world’s largest professional association for the advancement of technology.

NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Above: JBU Engineering students, 2012)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Above: JBU Engineering students receiving their awards, 2013)

Several JBU Engineering students "Eaglenauts" compete each year in the annual NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Once again JBU was represented well by the 2013 Lunabotics team at NASA’s fourth annual Lunabotics Competition held at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In 2012, our team placed fourth overall. They brought home second in the "Systems Engineering Paper" category, third in the "Outreach Award" category, and fourth in the "Lunar Dirt Mining" category. In 2013, our team brought home awards for second in “Oral Presentation” and third in “Systems Engineering Paper” categories. Fifty teams from all over the world participated in 2013 mining competition.

Check out our JBU Lunabotics Facebook Page!

Computer Programming Competition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Every spring, a dozen enthusiastic engineering students get together on a Saturday morning for the JBU Computer Programming Competition.  They work intensely in teams for five hours, using programming to solve a set of logical challenges.  Student teams are allowed to use C++, C#, C, or Java to solve the problems, and the teams that solve the most problems in the shortest amount of time win prizes.  The opportunity for students to hone their programming and problem solving skills helps to prepare them for real-world engineering jobs. For more information, read the press release from our very own Threefold Advocate.