About Student Employment at JBU

 

In the early years of JBU, every student worked as a part of his or her education. Students made dresses, furniture, baked goods, and many other products to pay for the costs of the instruction they received here. Today, we employ over 600 students each year. Most work 8 hours per week. The pay is $7.25 per hour, and most students have an award of $1,700.

 

The JBU Financial Aid Office may award workstudy as part of the student's financial aid package. Students schedule work around their classes. To earn his or her maximum workstudy award, the student must work an average of eight hours per week. Students receive payment twice a month via check or direct deposit. Students can apply their earnings to tuition and room/board expenses by making payments to their account, or use workstudy funds for other expenses. (Please note, workstudy awards are not automatically counted as aid when calculating monthly payment plans. This is because workstudy funds are an "earned award," based on the total number of hours a student works.) To apply for workstudy, students need to file the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).

 

Freshmen accept service positions in one of three areas that are essential to the daily operation of the campus: food services, custodial services, or grounds crew.

 

Each summer, upperclassmen apply for jobs open for the fall semester. These positions include Walton Lifetime Health Complex front desk monitors, admissions interns, teacher assistants, library assistants, computer lab monitors, and many others.

 

Federal community service jobs include reading and math tutors, Boys and Girls Club Leaders, public library attendants, and work with other local non-profit organizations.

 

Expectations for Student Employees

Expectations for Workstudy Supervisors

 

In our view, the end of all work is to please God. We stand against the view, prevalent in the world today, that a job or career is chosen to please the self alone. In the world's value system, the gods of money and status become the measures of success. A penniless missionary in some distant field of Christian service simply does not fit very well into this career plan. We believe that every occupation holds within it the potential for Christian service.
--John E. Brown